Is Excessive Homework in Private Schools a Customer Service Issue?

Posted by:     Tags:  , , , , , , , ,     Posted date:  October 19, 2011  |  No comment




The average private school tuition is over ten thousand dollars a year (and in many large cities it is often three times that amount). Do the customers of these schools, the children who attend them and the parents who pay for them, have the same rights other customers do? In recent years, one of the areas in which this question has received most attention is the fiercely contested battle over homework.

Children in private schools often have several hours of homework a night by the time they reach middle school. This often requires them to study ten to twelve hours a day with virtually no time to relax, play, or socialize with their friends during the week. It often robs them of much of their weekend as well.

This kind of work load is no small matter. If we imagined children spending twelve hours a day hunched over a sewing machine rather than a desk, we would be appalled. Indeed, play, is a crucial component of healthy child development. It affects children’s creativity, their social skills, and even their brain development.

The absence of play, physical exercise, and free-form social interaction takes a serious toll on many children. It can also have significant health implications as is evidenced by our current epidemic of childhood obesity, sleep deprivation, low self- esteem, and depression.

Experts in education recommend children have no more than ten minutes of homework per day per grade level. The average seventh grader should have no more than an hour and ten minutes a day of homework (instead of three times that amount). Having an extra two hours an evening to play, relax, or see a friend would obviously constitute a huge bump in any child’s quality of life.

The question is do parents who pay huge amounts of money to send their children to private schools have the same right to make customer complaints as the customers of any other business would? And do private schools treat complaints from their ‘customers’ as any business would (or should)?

Parents in the know have been fighting the homework battle for some years now and where private schools are concerned, with some measure of success. Speaking up and educating the school about homework research often has an impact on getting teachers to reduce the amount of homework they give (especially in younger grades). Parents of older children are advised to get become educated about homework research (you can find resources here) and to address the issue as a group. By doing so, they are far more likely to get a response from the school because they represent not just a group of parents but a group of customers as well.

What do you think? Do parents of children in private schools have the same rights as other customers do?

You might also like: How Much Homework is Too Much?

Copyright 2011 Guy Winch

Follow me on Twitter @GuyWinch



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